• Microsoft plans to unveil Windows 8 on the Microsoft Build Conference

    Posted on September 13th, 2011 David Brooks | No comments

    The 2011 Microsoft Build Conference is being held in Anaheim of California during September 13 and September 16. BUILD is a new event that shows modern hardware and software developers how to take advantage of the future of Windows. The latest news showed that Microsoft would be going to unveil the new Windows 8 details on the beginning day of the conference.

    The biggest appeal of Windows 8 is that it will offer the Windows platform on tablets for the first time in addition to personal computers. The biggest question is whether Microsoft is too late to make a stand in the tablet war raging between Apple’s iPad and various Google slates.
    Windows 8This is a very important moment for Microsoft. Since the popularity of tablets smartphones, especially Apple iPad and other tablet devices, owns the functions to replace PC, the sales volume growth rate of PC has been slowed down. And by far, Microsoft has output no competitive solutions to the sharp competition from tablets. Microsoft needs to innovate now to keep a hold on its market share. If the company can really find a way to bridge the gap between mobile computing and desktop computing, then it could have a winner on its hands.

    Here are the highlights of what we know about Windows 8:
    1. It supports ARM architecture, creating a threat to the “Wintel” partnership Intel and Microsoft has shared for years.
    2. The interface is similar to the “live tiles” in the Windows Phone 7 system — and phones are supposed to get a flavor of Windows 8 at some point.
    3. It’s supposed to have faster boot times, USB 3.0 support and Hyper-V integration.
    4. The interface was designed as a touch-first interface, though it will work “equally well” with a mouse and keyboard.

    Stay tuned for more detailed information.

    Related information
    How to convert DVD to Windows Phone 7
    How to convert DVD to iPhone 5 to watch DVD on iPhone 5

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  • Windows Phone 7 Mango Build 7712 jailbreak and updated new features

    Posted on August 1st, 2011 David Brooks | No comments

    Most Windows Phone 7 Mango 7661 users must have received the update news about the Mango Build 7712 version. Compared with the previous 7661 version, the new updated Mango Build 7712 mainly updates in fixing some bugs and upgrading a few mobile phone functions. The Mango Build 7712 is just a very simple and little update for Windows Phone 7 users. And in this post, I would like to share some Windows Phone 7 Mango Build 7712 jailbreak directions and the new updated mobile phone features with all of you guys.

    I would firstly introduce the steps to update your Windows Phone 7 Mango 7661 to 7712. The premise of updating your Windows Phone 7 to 7712 version is that the existing mobile operation system is 7661 version. For users who would like to install jailbreak apps, please make sure you have made successful jailbreak. Taking Samsung Omnia 7 (i8700) as an example, when you connect your phone to your computer, Zune 4.8 would automatically remind you the available new update, click “Update Now” and wait for the update completed.

    Windows Phone 7 Mango Build 7712

    When the update is successful, your mobile would restart automatically and you would find your staring up logo of your mobile phone turns to red. After the update, your jailbreak would be default as ineffective. You need to restart them. Input “##634#” on the dialing interface to enter Service Menu and input “*#9908#” to enter GPRS Manager, then choose previous imported unlock configurations and click “Save” to restart jailbreaking.

    GPRS Manager Unlock

    After that, return to the main menu and select the previous installed Samsung Tools (if not able to enter this app, do the above settings again), and check all 4 options to confirm. When the prompt shows the mobile phone needs to restart, confirm that. Now, the jailbreak of your Windows Phone 7 Mango Build 7712 update has been jailbroke successfully.

    Well, now, let’s take a look at what new updated features the Windows Phone 7 Mango Build 7712 brings. Firstly some major updates for some popular apps:

    1. Twitter has been consolidated to the “What’s New Feeds”, with the instant upgrading notice showed in the big “Me” icon on the screen.

    2. Five Hubs (People/Zune/Pictures/Zune/Marketplace hub) owns more vivid dynamic effects.

    3. Visual Voicemail interface adjusted for more convenient use.

    4. Supports to share Twitter page links through Twitter.

    5. Multi-task Manager interface rolls fast with up to 5 apps available to start, not slowly rolling one by one, and less screen space required.

    Other minor updates:

    1. Consolidated LinkedIn.

    2. Paste icon shows only content copied or cut in clipboard.

    3. Copy and paste sounds better, like digital water-drop.

    4. New Windows starting-up logo.

    5. No square icon for People Hub in Groups.

    6. In Music + Videos Hub, the random play button moved to the bottom and previous triangle icon changed to music marks, and the Marquee content has been arranged in alphabetical order.

    7. In Bing Maps, Me button icon has been changed.

    8. Optimized Bing Map search results.

    9. When the text inputting jumps to a new paragraph, the first letter would be automatically capitalized.


    To sum up, the Windows Phone 7 Mango Build 7712 mostly upgrades in minor functions, no new apps along. In the end, let’s watch the Build 7712 operation demo to get a close look:

    Related readings:

    How to Install Mango Build 7712 On Any Windows Phone 7 Device

    How to rip DVD to WP 7 Mango phones to watch DVD movies on Mango phones

    How to rip Blu-ray to WP 7 Mango phones to watch HD Blu ray on Mango phones

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  • New Windows Phone 7 Mango Specs: User friendly Custom ringtones are coming

    Posted on June 29th, 2011 David Brooks | No comments

    It has been all known that the next generation of Windows Phone, Windows Phone 7 Mango, will come out this fall. Right yesterday, the Windows team blog released another great improvement of Windows Phone 7 Mango, which has settled the long anticipated custom ringtone problem. The upcoming Windows Phone 7 Mango would provide users with user-friendly ringtone customization function.

    Windows Phone 7 Mango

    One possibility of this long expected upcoming function is that an additional option “Save as Ringtone” will be added for you to add your customized sound, audio or music, which would help you turn your customized files into a unique ringtone on Windows Phone 7 Mango. In Mango, any Marketplace app that revolves around sound or music—karaoke apps, sound effect apps, DJ apps, music instrument apps—potentially become a source of new custom ringtones for your phone.

    Custom Ringtone

    Yet, the Mango will provide users the chance to customize ringtones with some restrictions, shows as bellow:

    1. 39 seconds or shorter

    2. Smaller than 1 megabyte (MB)

    3. Saved in MP3 or WMA format

    4. Not copy-protected (i.e. DRM free)

    The detailed tutorial of how to do this would be out along with the street date of Windows Phone 7 Mango. For Zune users, when you have customized an audio file that meets the above conditions, just save it in the Genre of Ringtone and then you could sync your customized ringtone to the Windows Phone 7 Mango, showed in the bellow picture:

    Custom Ringtone Zune

    Besides the function of customizing ringtones in Windows Phone 7 Mango, it also provides some new native Microsoft ringtones for users.

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  • Microsoft unveiled Windows 8 on Microsoft Build Conference

    Posted on June 14th, 2011 David Brooks | No comments

    I have written a post on the upcoming Microsoft Windows 8 operation system on the Microsoft Build Conference during September 13 and 16. And on Tuesday, the detailed information about Microsoft unveiling Windows 8 had been reported. The following information was provided by Ed Bott from ZDNet. Check the information to get the detailed introduction about Microsoft Windows 8.

    Summary: This morning, Microsoft officially took the wraps off of Windows 8, unveiling its radically revised new operating system in front af an audience of software developers. I had a chance to get my hands on the new system (literally) last night. Here’s what you can look forward to.

    If you think you know what to expect from Windows 8, just wait till you get your hands on it.

    I stayed up far too late last night, experimenting with the developer preview build that Microsoft will show off to the public for the first time today. I wanted to get a good night’s sleep, but I literally couldn’t keep my hands off the sleek Windows 8-powered tablet that I have on loan for the rest of this week.

    Screenshots: First look at Windows 8

    The new OS has more than its share of rough edges, and the new “modern shell” is disorienting—at least initially. And Windows boss Steven Sinofsky took great pains to stress that this is not a launch but rather the initial availability of the platform for developers. Still, after a few hours of increasingly addictive hands-on experience, I am convinced that this new release will indeed be a very big deal.

    Windows 8 start screenAlthough you can use Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard, it’s at its best on a touchscreen-equipped tablet like the one I tested. The form factor is thin, but this compact PC is no lightweight; there’s a fully loaded PC under the hood, with an i5 processor, 4 GB of RAM, and a speedy solid-state drive. With a screen resolution of 1366 by 768, it’s capable of playing high-definition videos and meets the minimum spec to arrange two of the new Metro-style apps side-by-side.

    The Windows 8 difference is obvious from the moment you boot it up. As part of the setup process, I configured the system to use my Windows Live ID and password as the login, which automatically picked up my picture for the user tile on the Start page. Choosing this configuration also allows you to sync your personalized settings to the cloud so they can roam with you as you switch between devices.

    Getting around in the new shell via a touchscreen device tablet requires mastering a few gestures:

    Swipe in from the right side of the screen to display the vertical strip of “charms” (that’s the official name) shown here. The five icons replace the Windows Start menu and allow quick access to commonly used functions. A Windows button in the center returns to the Start screen (mimicking the action of the equivalent hardware key with the Windows logo on it). While the charms column is visible, the main screen also shows the date and time and provides quick visual indicators for battery life, WiFi status, and other useful details.

    Windows 8 charmsMetro-style apps are borderless and occupy the full screen. If your display has a resolution of 1366 by 768 or better, you can snap a Metro-style app into a skinny strip along the side, with another one occupying the remainder of the screen. Ironically, the feature that gave the operating system its name is gone for new Metro-style apps—there’s no option for overlapping windows except on the traditional desktop.

    When a Metro-style app is running, you can swipe up from the bottom or down from the top to display commands that are available for that app, as shown here. This behavior provides uniform access to app-specific commands and options for any program written to use the new Metro style.

    Windows 8 app toolsWhen multiple Metro-style apps are open, you use another gesture—a quick swipe in from the left edge of the screen—to switch between apps. (The familiar Alt+Tab and Windows key+tab shortcuts work as well.)

    Of course, you can use the familiar pinch gesture to zoom in or out in photos, web pages, and other places where that option makes sense.

    If you use a keyboard and mouse, the same controls are available, but the techniques to access them are slightly different. To reveal the charms, for example, you move the mouse to the lower left corner of the screen—the spot where the Start button traditionally lived.

    In my testing so far, the touch screen has been consistently responsive and accurate, with no lag or hesitation.

    If you tap a finger anywhere that accepts alphanumeric input, you’ll see an on-screen keyboard like the one shown below. If you think it looks a lot like the one in Windows Phone 7, you’re right. In fact, Windows 8 bears a striking number of visual similarities to the Windows Phone OS.

    One innovation that should win at least a few fans is the option to reconfigure the keyboard so that its keys are evenly split between the left and right halves. That makes it easier to type with your thumbs while gripping the tablet with two hands.

    This is the more traditional layout.

    Windows 8 onscreen keyboardAnd this is the split, thumb-friendly layout:

    Windows 8 onscreen keyboard thumbThe new search interface appears when you click or tap the Search icon at the top of the list of charms. Doing so slides out a search pane, with a box at the top where you can begin typing text. If you want to constrain the search to files, apps, or settings, those options are all available. You can also point the search to an app (like Internet Explorer) and send the search to that app.

    In this example, I’ve just begun to search the Apps group, narrowing down the list of available apps to the handful shown here.

    Windows 8 searchOne of the first questions I had when I saw a demo of Windows 8 was how Microsoft plans to deal with the large and potentially confusing array of options in Control Panel. Not surprisingly, the solution came from the telemetry data that Windows’ designers collect from end users (according to Microsoft’s Gabe Aul, more than 1 trillion telemetry data points from Windows 7 users were analyzed last year).

    The Metro-style Control Panel provides a telemetry-driven subset of all the commands available in the traditional Control Panel, which is accessible in the classic Windows desktop.

    Windows 8 control panelIf you look carefully on that screen, you can see a pair of new Windows 8 features. With a few clicks (and an administrator’s credentials) you can refresh or reset your PC. What’s the difference? A reset puts your PC back to factory settings, wiping out data in the process. A refresh is similar to a System Restore operation, restoring your operating system to a known good state while keeping data files and settings intact.

    For the most part, the traditional Windows desktop acts like a full-screen app. Any Win32 apps run in that environment, where you can move and arrange app windows using all the familiar techniques from earlier Windows versions (including the Windows 7 Aero Snap techniques).

    Because the screen on this test device meets the minimum width requirements, it provides the option to arrange two Metro-style apps side by side. In this configuration, one app gets a slim strip along the side, with the other app using the remaining screen space. Interestingly, a Windows 8 desktop session can use either of these spaces. In the skinny configuration, you see individual programs that are open in that desktop session, as shown here.

    Windows 8 split screenTo arrange windows in this fashion, you use the swipe-from-the-left gesture, stopping when you reach the point where the green split bar appears. Move the split bar to the left or right to change the proportions of the two apps.

    Every Metro-style app has access to a full range of system services, including the ability to pick files from a screen that looks like no Windows dialog box you’ve seen before.

    Windows 8 photopickerThe test machine I’ve been experimenting with came loaded with a large selection of sample Metro-style apps, mostly games. At a briefing for journalists yesterday, Sinofsky pointed out that the apps were written by Microsoft summer interns, all sophomores and juniors in college.

    One place where the old desktop occasionally intrudes into the new, modern shell is with the appearance of the restyled task manager. Clicking its icon on the Start screen pops up a simple list of running apps, with an End Task button you can use to kill a program that isn’t responding.

    Windows 8 task manager simpleClicking the More Details arrow at the bottom displays an expanded Task Manager, similar to the one shown here. The additional details on the Processes tab, for example, allow you to see at a glance whether an ind

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  • Microsoft unleashed reimagining new specifications and functions of Windows 8 at the D9 Conferences

    Posted on June 1st, 2011 David Brooks | No comments

    REDMOND, Wash. – June 1, 2011 – Today, at the D9 Conference, we demonstrated the next generation of Microsoft logoWindows, internally code-named “Windows 8,” for the first time. Windows 8 is a reimagining of Windows, from the chip to the interface. A Windows 8-based PC is really a new kind of device, one that scales from touch-only small screens through to large screens, with or without a keyboard and mouse.

    The demo showed some of the ways we’ve reimagined the interface for a new generation of touch-centric hardware. Fast, fluid and dynamic, the experience has been transformed while keeping the power, flexibility and connectivity of Windows intact.

    Here are a few aspects of the new interface we showed today:

    •       Fast launching of apps from a tile-based Start screen, which replaces the Windows Start menu with a customizable, scalable full-screen view of apps.

    •       Live tiles with notifications, showing always up-to-date information from your apps.

    •       Fluid, natural switching between running apps.

    •       Convenient ability to snap and resize an app to the side of the screen, so you can really multitask using the capabilities of Windows.

    •       Web-connected and Web-powered apps built using HTML5 and JavaScript that have access to the full power of the PC.

    •       Fully touch-optimized browsing, with all the power of hardware-accelerated Internet Explorer 10.

    Windows 8

    We also showed effortless movement between existing Windows programs and new Windows 8 apps. The full capabilities of Windows continue to be available to you, including the Windows Explorer and Desktop, as does compatibility with all Windows 7 logo PCs, software and peripherals.

    Although the new user interface is designed and optimized for touch, it works equally well with a mouse and keyboard. Our approach means no compromises — you get to use whatever kind of device you prefer, with peripherals you choose, to run the apps you love. This is sure to inspire a new generation of hardware and software development, improving the experience for PC users around the world.

    Today, we also talked a bit about how developers will build apps for the new system. Windows 8 apps use the power of HTML5, tapping into the native capabilities of Windows using standard JavaScript and HTML to deliver new kinds of experiences. These new Windows 8 apps are full-screen and touch-optimized, and they easily integrate with the capabilities of the new Windows user interface. There’s much more to the platform, capabilities and tools than we showed today.

    We are excited to bring an innovative new platform and tools to developers and see how their creativity jumpstarts a new generation of apps. Windows 8 apps can use a broad set of new libraries and controls, designed for fluid interaction and seamless connectivity. Apps can add new capabilities to Windows and to other apps, connecting with one another through the new interface. For example, we showed today how a developer can extend the file picker control to enable picking from their own app content or from within another Windows 8 app, in addition to the local file system and the network. We’re just getting started.

    And this isn’t just about touch PCs. The new Windows experience will ultimately be powered by application and device developers around the world — one experience across a tremendous variety of PCs. The user interface and new apps will work with or without a keyboard and mouse on a broad range of screen sizes and pixel densities, from small slates to laptops, desktops, all-in-ones, and even classroom-sized displays. Hundreds of millions of PCs will run the new Windows 8 user interface. This breadth of hardware choice is unique to Windows and central to how we see Windows evolving.

    The video below introduces a few of the basic elements of the new user interface. Although we have much more to reveal at our developer event, BUILD (Sept. 13 – 16 in Anaheim, Calif.), we’re excited to share our progress with you.

    Today’s demonstration followed our announcements earlier this year about Windows 8 running on System on a Chip (SoC) processors, and our browser engine innovations and significantly increased standards support in Internet Explorer 10. Windows 8 extends these innovations and reimagines every level of the Windows architecture — the kernel, networking, storage, devices, user interface — all building on the broadest and richest ecosystem of software, peripherals and devices.

    We have so much more on the way! We’re working very hard to get the product ready for early testing, and we plan to kick off our engineering dialogue through our team blog, just as we did for Windows 7.

    So please stay tuned — we have a lot of cool innovation coming in the months ahead.

    By Julie Larson-Green

    Corporate Vice President, Windows Experience

    Sources from

    http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/Features/2011/jun11/06-01corporatenews.aspx.

  • Angry Birds is pushed back to land on Windows Phone 7 on June 29th

    Posted on May 19th, 2011 David Brooks | No comments

    The landing time on Angry Birds game on Windows phone 7 platform was set to be May 25th. And for some reasons, the company had to wait until the official release date was close to announce the delay, so it could be that the Angry Birds team, Rovio, was unsure of the delay until recent days. Now, Angry Birds is made clear to land on Windows Phone 7 platform on June 29th, more than a month later.

    Angry Birds

    It has been a long time for Angry Birds to land on Window Phone 7 platform, ever since February. However the cooperation between the Angry Birds team and Microsoft seems to be not as fluently as people anticipated. Until April, the official landing date was released. Now, the landing time has been delayed.  


    Angry Birds is a cultural phenomenon of a game, with fanatic users cross a half-dozen platforms all around the world. Its entrance into the world of Windows Phone 7 has been hotly anticipated by both expectant users. Due to the delay, Windows Phone 7 users may have to wait for a little long time experience Angry Birds game on Windows Phones.

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  • Windows 7 ramps up support for video and audio format

    Posted on November 23rd, 2009 admin | No comments

    As a supernova in the history of Windows operation system, Windows 7 furnishes a cluster of compelling and spicy features. One of the big margins between Windows 7 and its predecessor, currently dominant Windows XP OS is manifested on the system’s multimedia capabilities. Users of Windows XP must have long been cumbered by the system devoid of playback support for many popular video formats except the software giant’s own patent formats ASF and WMV. Now with the advent of Windows 7, gone was the requirement to install a third-party media player, added with the powerful ability of video playback. And you are to be convinced by the charts below.

    Chart 1: Video formats supported by Windows 7 in terms of Format Name

    Chart 2: Multimedia decoders toted by Windows 7 listed in categories

    Windows 7 not only supports AVI and MP4 formats but embraces mobile video format 3GP/3G2 for the very first time. This rich batch of toted codec allows for immediate playback of such popular video formats right upon the first installation of the system, enabling fast experience between the system and many portable devices without the hassle to consider a third-party player or codec pack. Additionally, HD video formats like AVCHD and HDV are found supported in Windows 7. It is a great boon for users especially netbook users to enjoy HD videos in no time.

    Reversely, portable media players are known to lag behind in video format support, for example, iPod/iPhone acknowledges MP4, handsets mostly accepts only 3GP, Windows mobile excludes formats other than WMV. But it is not a trouble any more, we can use video converter to convert to video to almost any format we want. Leawo Video Converter is a one-stop solution for video conversion plus ingenious video customization. With complete optimal profiles, Leawo Video Converter can enable video to smoothly play on iPod/iPhone, PSP/PS3, Apple TV, Zune, Windows Mobile, PMP, Wii/DS and many other devices. Here is a collection of introductions of Leawo Video Converter’s highlighted features, feel free to take a peek.

    1. Adjust audiovisual effects
    2. Trim video length
    3. Crop video screen size
    4. Add watermark
    5. Capture video screenshot
    6. Advanced codec settings

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  • Can I use Windows Live Movie Maker in a more efficient way?

    Posted on November 22nd, 2009 admin | No comments

    Yes! Windows Live Movie Maker is a remake of the default Windows component based on much advanced and human technologies. Some new features are especially added in the perspective of a better operability and efficiency. Let’s take a look at how the efficient features can appeal to us.

    Firstly, use keyboard shortcuts! Windows Live Movie Maker adopts the same Ribbon design introduced in Office 2007. This "scenic" and magical Ribbon erases the complexity of menus and reduces access time by always putting user’s favorite functions at the front. If you are a keyboard shortcut fanatic, you could find Windows Live Movie Maker embraces familiar keyboard shortcuts as are used in Office 2007. Apart from ordinary shortcuts, here is a table illustrating particular shortcuts in Windows Live Movie Maker.

    General keyboard shortcuts

    To

    Press

    Toggle ribbon keytips on and off

    Alt

    Stop the current task

    Esc

    View Help for Movie Maker

    F1

    Close Movie Maker

    Alt+F4

    Save a project with a new name

    F12

    Create a new project

    Ctrl+N

    Open an existing project

    Ctrl+O

    Save a project

    Ctrl+S

    Undo the last action

    Ctrl+Z

    Redo the last action

    Ctrl+Y

    Previewing and editing keyboard shortcuts

    To

    Press

    Play or pause

    Space or K

    Go to the previous frame

    J

    Go to the next frame

    L

    Trim the video so it starts at the current point in the video

    I

    Trim the video so it ends at the current point in the video

    O

    Split the video into two items at the current point in the video

    M

    Storyboard keyboard shortcuts

    To

    Press

    Cut the selected item

    Ctrl+X

    Copy the selected item

    Ctrl+C

    Paste

    Ctrl+V

    Delete selected items

    Delete

    Move the selection one item in the direction of the arrow

    Left Arrow, Right Arrow, Up Arrow, Down Arrow

    Move the focus one item in the direction of the arrow

    Ctrl+Left Arrow, Ctrl+Right Arrow, Ctrl+Up Arrow, Ctrl+Down Arrow

    Move the selection up one page

    Page Up

    Move the selection down one page

    Page Down

    Select the first item on the storyboard

    Home

    Select the last item on the storyboard

    End

    Select all items on the same track of the storyboard

    Ctrl+A

    Zoom in on the storyboard

    Plus Sign (+)

    Zoom out on the storyboard

    Minus Sign (-)

    To name a very special one of the shortcuts, there is a very intuitive way in edit videos on the Storyboard, i.e. use "Ctrl" key and key "A" combination to make a full selection of the videos to batch edit them through one shot. Similar to the scenery in the file browser, you can hold down Ctrl Key and select multiple videos to batch edit, which is very efficient when you want to apply many videos with the same setting.

    Secondly, use Quick Access Toolbar! You can self-customize a set of shortcut to your liking. Hover to the function icon and right click to expose a context menu as below. It will add the function to the Quick Access Toolbar and allow you to quick access it with key combinations of "Alt" key and numeral key "0"-"9".

    Thirdly, use Multi-monitor span! If you are handling a huge batch of video clips, don’t sigh as your monitor screen is not big enough to give you a full view of them, because Windows Live Movie Maker seamlessly supports multiple monitor display! You can just span the interface to the second monitor to get the video preview and the Storyboard to display separately on the monitors. Would you not prefer a nice and clear view of the work you are doing?

    I would like to conclude by saying Windows Live Movie Maker is really a wow to us home video makers. User experience is greatly improved. Novice users will be happy to see not only the bar is lower but they are given more flexibility to use the program in their favorite way. Whether or not you are big on efficiency, you would unlikely resist such appeal.

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